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Thendofreason

9.8k points

2 months ago

The Increasingly Inaccurately Named Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy trilogy.

cohonan

4.4k points

2 months ago

cohonan

4.4k points

2 months ago

My favorite thing about Hitchikers Guide is that it’s been a book, radio play, tv show, movie, video game, and in every instance Douglas Adams’ changed the story a little bit, so there isn’t any “canon”.

iced1777

1.7k points

2 months ago

iced1777

1.7k points

2 months ago

I know very little about the man but that sounds like exactly something he'd do

NetDork

1.3k points

2 months ago

NetDork

1.3k points

2 months ago

In the forward to one of the book collections he straight up said that every time The Guide gets put into a new medium, it has to be changed a bit.

levmeister

845 points

2 months ago

Ha I have the trilogy in book form, it looks exactly like a bible when I have it open; gold leaf and everything. The number of people who have asked me if I'm reading 'the Good Book' while toting it around is astonishing. I always just respond: "yeah, hitchhikers guide to the Galaxy," and the look on their faces I swear.

evil_timmy

627 points

2 months ago

TBH if more religious texts had DON'T PANIC written in huge print on the back cover, we'd be living in a far better, less fear-driven world.

Frap_Gadz

160 points

2 months ago

Frap_Gadz

160 points

2 months ago

Imagine a world where we all know where our towel is.

Future_Jared

86 points

2 months ago

We'd all be hoopy froods

j3pl

23 points

2 months ago

j3pl

23 points

2 months ago

There's a frood who really knows where his towel is.

levmeister

2 points

2 months ago

Well he wouldn't be a frood if he didn't. You can't be really, amazingly together if you don't know where your towel is. Maybe you could be froopy... If you're otherwise cool and well-together.

jgrantgryphon

3 points

2 months ago

Any good religion is not about *what* you believe, it's about finding your own inner hoopy frood.

levmeister

2 points

2 months ago

Hey are you implying that I am both not cool and not amazingly well together? Because I take offense to that my good sir or madam.

Justice_0f_Toren

4 points

2 months ago

An alien can dream

TheAuroraKing

6 points

2 months ago

You know what happens when you don't know where your towel is? You get out of the shower to discover you forgot where it was and then you have to traipse all over the house getting water everywhere.

This happened to me a couple days ago and I'm still mad about it. Remembering your towel is no joke, kids.

ceallachdon

7 points

2 months ago

"Fear Not!"

stefan92293

24 points

2 months ago

To be fair, the Bible has "Fear not" like 365 times 😅

Beardywierdy

32 points

2 months ago

Yeah, but not in large friendly letters on the front cover.

_Kendii_

9 points

2 months ago

Doesn’t have quite the same ring to it, tbh

inboccoallupo

3 points

2 months ago

That's funny... you think people read religious texts.

RawrRRitchie

0 points

2 months ago

If trigger happy police officers in the states had that on their guns the country would be a much safer place

ItIsHappy

140 points

2 months ago

ItIsHappy

140 points

2 months ago

I read that book religiously growing up, so the cover always felt appropriate. Literally once per year though all of high-school.

2Ben3510

13 points

2 months ago

Same here, except i read it in french which was probably the best translation of all time, potentially better than the original (though the translator, Jean Bonnefoy, took a lot of liberties that purists will reprove).
Unfortunately the fucking editor thought it'd be smart to retranslate it partially when the movie came out, to match names among other things, destroying all the puns added by Bonnefoy and leaving just rubbish nonsense. I fucking hate them so much for that.
Fortunately I still have my old edition which is one of the last correct ones, since only the new shit is now available.
One day I'll scan it and release it as epub.

unoriginalpackaging

10 points

2 months ago

I did a book report on it every year for six years. I basically copy/pasta’d my last years report and tweaked it. I figured it was an appropriate way to get out of any real work.

levmeister

19 points

2 months ago

Hah same. Eventually I remembered it so well I didn't really need to, but just for that look I would always get I would carry it around in my backpack anyway.

kuzared

2 points

2 months ago

Re-reading it now - I’m at the beginning of Restaurant.

ralphvonwauwau

2 points

2 months ago

Time to meet the meat.

PamCokeyMonster

2 points

2 months ago

So u can read it in Sunday school and church?

norml329

123 points

2 months ago

norml329

123 points

2 months ago

I have a Vonnegut collection like that, and someone on the train asked me if I was reading the bible. The girl next to me (who knew it was his work) said "well it might as well be to some people". Wish I got her number lol

_kitkat_purrs_

10 points

2 months ago

Haven't explored Vonnegut at all. Mind sharing your favourite piece?

threequartertoupee

16 points

2 months ago

Not the person you're asking, but I personally loved slaughter house 5.

All of his books that I've read have this really dry wit while talking about heavy subjects, but the characters are almost unable to process anything that's happening, so it starts to make you feel like you're the crazy one.

Just what I took from it, anyway.

Lil__May

4 points

2 months ago

So it goes

_kitkat_purrs_

3 points

2 months ago

Interesting

coco-channel24

7 points

2 months ago

I just remember a lot of detail like Dresden. A dog being fed razor blades in meat.

yenozeno

8 points

2 months ago

His early stuff is great but after reading all his novels the later works like Galapagos and Bluebird stand out to me more.

myCatHateSkinnyPuppy

9 points

2 months ago

I havent read Galapagos in 20 years but its the best speculative fiction about how evolution works.

yenozeno

2 points

2 months ago

Agree

whatsgoodbaby

7 points

2 months ago

Breakfast of Champions is an excellent read

myCatHateSkinnyPuppy

6 points

2 months ago

Vonnegut blends the line between the fleeting absurdity of life and the dire reality of it. He uses dark comedy, sci-fi and real events to structure his stories and explores the “nature of mankind” through elaborate and simple tales. I would start with “Cats Cradle” since that really brings together everything he brings to the table. “Slaughterhouse 5” is generally regarded as his best but it heavily relies on his experience in WW2.

_kitkat_purrs_

3 points

2 months ago

Thanks for sharing

_kitkat_purrs_

3 points

2 months ago

He sounds like my type

Meanderingversion

5 points

2 months ago

I highly recommend everything he wrote.

norml329

2 points

2 months ago

I never read a piece of his I didn't thoughly enjoy. I'd just start chronologically, his first book was Sirens of Titan, which actually is one of my favorites.

elcabeza79

2 points

2 months ago

Start with Slaughter House 5 to get an understanding of his voice and tone.

th3f00l

32 points

2 months ago

th3f00l

32 points

2 months ago

Lol. My wife remembers seeing me on the train before we met because it looked like I was reading a Bible (for this exact reason).

Mr_E

5 points

2 months ago

Mr_E

5 points

2 months ago

I married two friends and used the Hitchhiker's Guide instead of a Bible.

Ask_Me_About_My_Pie

3 points

2 months ago

Barns n nobles classic edition?

OldUKman

3 points

2 months ago

Where do I start? I have the original radio play in cassette, the books, the tv show on VHS, the move (less said the better) and the BBC remake of the radio play on vinyl, as well as many other of his books. He was a much underrated genius!

LazyNovelSilkWorm

2 points

2 months ago

Now i'm wondering where i can get that version. One of my favourite books ever

karateema

2 points

2 months ago

What edition is that? You got a picture?

Oriden

12 points

2 months ago

Oriden

12 points

2 months ago

He also complained (only slightly) that there are now two versions of the Guide that aren't different. The Radio Plays and the published Transcripts for the Radio plays.

nrsys

7 points

2 months ago

nrsys

7 points

2 months ago

I believe he then goes on to state that this version intends to set the record straight, or at least definitively wrong...

NetDork

7 points

2 months ago

I believe "firmly crooked" was the wording.

Everestkid

3 points

2 months ago

Many great lines in the "guide to the Guide" omnibus edition. One of my personal favourites:

"The first radio episode was broadcast on [date] at [time] on [station, probably a BBC one], to an audience of no one. Bats heard it. The odd dog barked."

trashed_culture

2 points

2 months ago

I've been reading hgttg for over thirty years, since I was in elementary school. I think about that foreword a lot. For one thing, it could possibly win"best foreword of all time". But more relevantly, it helped me accept that differences across mediums are necessary and even welcome.

MoffKalast

2 points

2 months ago

Well it makes sense, this is a plural sector.

Billy_droptables

256 points

2 months ago

Oh man, he's a personal hero of mine, early adopter of the internet, huge tech nerd, hilarious writer, genuinely good dude who didn't take life seriously.

I have a banner in my office with my favorite quote of his, "I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by." Cannot say my PMs love that one.

Would absolutely recommend reading his works.

RealPhali

10 points

2 months ago

And he wrote for Doctor Who, helped write lyrics for Pink Floyd- even coming up with the title for the 1994 album "The Division Bell" in exchange for a donation to his charity. Massive philanthropist and legend that we sadly lost way, way too soon.

Awestruck34

4 points

2 months ago

Oh my God. I've always thought he died in his seventies or eighties. He was forty nine, we certainly did lose him far too early

_Kendii_

3 points

2 months ago*

……What?

Edit: In a thread like this, you never know…. Is that a joke?

LoneRangersBand

2 points

2 months ago

And wrote for Monty Python. He's one of two non-Pythons to get a writing credit for Flying Circus, and as Python tradition was for the writer of the sketch to appear in it someway, he does in a small role.

aurumtt

8 points

2 months ago

he really was a big advocate for procrastination.
hero.

Billy_droptables

18 points

2 months ago

You're missing the point of it. It's not procrastinating, it's living life on his time. We currently live in a world where everything needs to be done right now and that's toxic as all fuck, especially in a creative space.

aurumtt

10 points

2 months ago

aurumtt

10 points

2 months ago

it's not a bad thing. it's literally what you say here.
to quote Steve Meretzky, who collaborated with him on the video game: “he certainly raised procrastination to an art form”

ConcernedDudeMaybe

2 points

2 months ago

This sounds familiar 🤣🍝🤣

necrojuicer

5 points

2 months ago

I heard that essentially the only reason why they managed to make the film at all because he died.

It's quite funny because I have pretty much every version as my place is something of a dumping ground for old books when my extended family goes through their stuff & gets rid of stuff. Apparently everytime they did a reprint Douglas went "Hold up! I have notes" and they would change a bit of the book everytime.

Mostly pretty minor, just changing how some jokes hit or adding some jokes into certain situations. I quite enjoyed the little quirks from him.

They say that whenever they planned to release a book the publisher had to lock him into a hotel room as he's easily distracted, especially when he has a task set out before him.

domasin

4 points

2 months ago

Apparently everytime they did a reprint Douglas went "Hold up! I have notes" and they would change a bit of the book everytime.

I didn't know this part and now my one set of books seems inadequate

necrojuicer

3 points

2 months ago

Yeah, so first time I read a first edition that dad bought when it came out & much later I read from the omnibus & a lot of the jokes were different so I went digging.

colin_staples

2 points

2 months ago

He was the first person to buy an Apple Macintosh in Europe, the second being Stephen Fry.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Adams#Technology_and_innovation

thinklikeashark

3 points

2 months ago

He's just this guy, ya know?

Endorkend

2 points

2 months ago

He's really damn interesting to get to know more about though.

His talks about his nature documentary work and general philosophical talks are just as entertaining as his books.

The man was an absolute treasure.

1986MetsWin

2 points

2 months ago

There is a book called The Salmon of Doubt that is a collection of Adams' essays and interviews posthumously published. My daughter and I listened to it on audiobook and were entranced. The man was a comic genius and taken away from us too soon. I would have loved for him to have been show runner for Doctor Who in the new series for a few years. That would have been epic.

Beragond1

44 points

2 months ago

That’s just because of the infinite improbability changing things

_Kendii_

4 points

2 months ago

Well yeah. What else would it be? =P

Definitely my favourite. After years and years of waiting, I finally got to share it with my daughter last year. 🥹

k9centipede

25 points

2 months ago

I was reading the big book in Highschool when I was always reading and walking.

I forget the chapter I was on, but it was talking about the issue with time travel is the grammar and went on for like 2 or more paragraphs about that before moving on in the story.

I looked up to step up a curb and then back down.

And it was the time travel paragraphs again.

For a solid 5 minutes I thought Douglas Adams had just copypasted the same paragraph in 2 parts to give a "you just traveled back in time while reading" experience.

Then I realized the page had just flipped back when I looked up.

JulienBrightside

2 points

2 months ago

That is kinda hilarious

PotatoCabbagePea

190 points

2 months ago

The radio play predates the book!

Unlucky-Cow-9296

101 points

2 months ago*

Then it was the BBC series, and third it was the book series!

I think that's why the books were so good, he had written 2 full fledged versions and had time to really craft it and flesh it out for the books.

EDIT: As pointed out, then fact checked... The first two novels came out before the series. The third came out after the BBC series.

matthoback

11 points

2 months ago

Then it was the BBC series, and third it was the book series!

No, the books came second. The first book was published immediately after the first radio series, the second book was after the second radio series, and then the TV series was produced, adapting the material from the first and second book. The third, fourth, and fifth books were later though.

Unlucky-Cow-9296

6 points

2 months ago

Yep, looks like you're right! I must've read editions after he finished the trilogy.

radams78

10 points

2 months ago*

Well, kinda. He missed the deadline for the first book, and eventually his publisher called him and said "Finish the page you're on and get the manuscript here now!" So the first book just breaks off in the middle of a Guide entry, has Zaphod say "Let's go to the Restaurant at the End of the Universe", and then ends.

Drunky_McStumble

16 points

2 months ago

Yeah, I love that it took the exact opposite route of any other mass media franchise. The books are technically a novelization of a TV adaptation of a radio show.

I think Adams would have quietly gotten a kick out of all the complaints that "it didn't do the books justice" when the movie came out.

matthoback

9 points

2 months ago

The books are technically a novelization of a TV adaptation of a radio show.

The TV show came after the first two books.

charmingpea

13 points

2 months ago

Wherein Peter Jones was the book...

cohonan

6 points

2 months ago

How old is the radio play?

nitewake

31 points

2 months ago

Older than the book.

Braincain007

15 points

2 months ago*

It was originally broadcast in the United Kingdom by BBC Radio 4 in 1978 from the 8th of March to the 12th of April as a 6 part series.

domasin

6 points

2 months ago

And it is BRILLIANT

ProtoKun7

5 points

2 months ago

Thank you for doing my job; I feel compelled to mention this whenever the Hitchhiker's Guide crops up because it feels like a lot of people assume the book was the original.

Kizik

3 points

2 months ago

Kizik

3 points

2 months ago

It's also better, in my opinion.

hotrodllsc

36 points

2 months ago

It made sense towards the end of the books. There's multiple universes and each one can be similar but slightly different. Each story could take place in a separate universe. That was my take as why the book and the movie were similar but different anyways.

numberbruncher

2 points

2 months ago

So we have Douglas Adams to blame for all this lazy multiverse nonsense!

purityaddiction

10 points

2 months ago

Radio Play is by far my favorite version.

Unlucky-Cow-9296

10 points

2 months ago

Check out the audio books narrated by Douglas Adams! Those are by far my favorite. You get the fun and perfected plot of the novels, AND Douglas Adams' radio personality/style voice acting.

Let me tell you! He had not even missed a step between the original radio play and audio books as far as charisma and voice acting.

Honestly, I haven't reread the books after I found out about those audio books. It's perfection.

fortalyst

3 points

2 months ago

100% this - love the audio books so much

WhatHoPipPip

2 points

2 months ago

The first one read by Stephen Fry and the rest by Martin Freeman were also fantastic. But Stephen Fry could read Vogon poetry and it'd still sound awesome.

FlameBoi3000

9 points

2 months ago

The opening letter to The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to The Galaxy is him detailing many of the differences and then saying he would continue to do the same thing here lol

HapticSloughton

10 points

2 months ago

Even so, the final line from Marvin in the most recent film really irked my nerd-brain:

"Not that anyone cares what I say, but the restaurant is at the other end of the universe."

Other end? Other end?! The restaurant is at a time, not a place.

Mammoth-Condition-60

7 points

2 months ago

Terms for times and places are often interchangeable - end is a good one, but we also talk about the length of time and how far away a location in space is in terms of the time it takes to get there (4.5 light years, 20 minutes by car, etc.). It's possible that's what Marvin meant - not that kind of end, the end of time kind of end - but no one cares what I say anyway.

HapticSloughton

2 points

2 months ago

Except we see the Heart of Gold change direction after he says it.

radams78

2 points

2 months ago

Unless they were heading for the Big Bang Burger Bar and Grill.

Internationalizard

8 points

2 months ago

THERES A VIDEO GAME‽

Please tell me that it has Vogon poetry.

Unlucky-Cow-9296

10 points

2 months ago

It's an old text based adventure game. You can find it converted to Java for play online. It's really intuitive and natural compared to other text adventure games back then. Douglas Adams himself worked and directed the designers, so every aspect has his fingerprint.

Additionally, the ever forward thinking Mer.Adams made a second game after graphics started picking up and adventure games caught up. It's Starship Titanic, and is first person 3d like Mist, with Bioshock art deco and Monkey Island style puzzles.

There's also a novelization of Starship Titanic which is part of the "continuity". Terry Jones wrote it, so he got the Adams humor style. I remember being pretty middle of the road when I read it, don't remember anything about it anymore. So might be worth a read, but don't expect a masterpiece.

hreloaded

6 points

2 months ago

It's really intuitive and natural compared to other text adventure games back then.

I mean, it has a puzzle that is so infamous. It is destined to be in top 10 the most wtf puzzles lists until the end of time.

I mostly played the start though and it was fun.

Omg I was gonna recommend another Infocom game, Bureaucracy for being pretty intuitivw and natural and... Apparently it was written by Douglas Adams too.

cohonan

6 points

2 months ago

I never played it but I think it’s the real old school text based adventure game.

radams78

3 points

2 months ago

Yes, there is. You can play it here.

Yes, it has original Vogon poetry written for the game.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/1g84m0sXpnNCv84GpN2PLZG/the-game-30th-anniversary-edition

nsfredditkarma

6 points

2 months ago

The only continuity is absurdity.

infinitemonkeytyping

4 points

2 months ago

Talking about canon, he wrote Hitchhiker's just after working on a TV show with canon issues - Doctor Who.

He was the script editor (which at the time meant he was the head writer for the show, and farmed out assignments for writing episodes to other writers).

matthoback

6 points

2 months ago

Talking about canon, he wrote Hitchhiker's just after working on a TV show with canon issues - Doctor Who.

Not only that, but both Life, The Universe, And Everything and Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency started out as Dr. Who scripts.

The_Jimes

4 points

2 months ago

Famously Douglas Adams grew to despise the property so he purposefully torpedoed the story every time he was asked to write a new book.

Unlucky-Cow-9296

7 points

2 months ago

Joke's on him, cause other than ooooold old school fans and literature buffs wanting more of the same... They're really fucking good.

Half of my favorite bits of the whole series are from 4 and 5. Random, flying, sector zz plural z alpha natives and hyperdrivs hyperdrive, sandwiches, immortality, pluto, and can't say anything while still keeping it vague and nonspoilery.

Apparently I'm a contrarian, cause I always thought Mostly Harmless was the perfect ending. Warts and all. It just fit the dark absurd British humor.

domasin

3 points

2 months ago

"What's a matress?"

Unlucky-Cow-9296

5 points

2 months ago

They're calm and gentle grazing creatures, much like horses on Earth. Only they have the misfortune of being exactly the same comfort and support as many sleeping mats as civilizations use across the universe.

They do have a survival instinct to use interdenominational travel, if they didn't they definitely would be extinct by now.

Poaching a mattress is much easier than hand crafting one, you see.

Drunky_McStumble

3 points

2 months ago

Well technically Adams didn't change anything for the movie, on account of being dead, but the rest stands.

greenie4242

5 points

2 months ago

Douglas had a lot of input into the movie before he passed away. It just took ages before they actually produced it. His death delayed it even further.

Can't remember where I read it, but his wife mentioned that his movie script was written before he died, and what was eventually released was pretty much what he'd planned it to be. So it was still his movie.

From the movie's Wikipedia page, "Adams wrote a new script, and Roach sought talent like Spike Jonze to direct, Hugh Laurie to play Arthur, and Jim Carrey as Zaphod, but then Adams died on 11 May 2001." I wish we could have seen that version!

I feel blessed to have heard Douglas Adams tell stories twice at book tours and he was just as amazing in person as his books. Very humble but very aware of things nobody else in society tends to notice, which tends to be the theme of many of his books.

He chatted about how excited he was to have signed Disney to produce the movie, then said to himself, "Disney? They make animated movies for kids! This seems odd," but Disney provided funding through Touchstone Pictures division which was one of their adult oriented studios. They released Armageddon, Good Morning, Vietnam, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Dead Poets Society, Pretty Woman, some seriously big movies.

Touchstone Pictures

CastSeven

3 points

2 months ago

I had to repeatedly explain this to someone who was very snobbish about the book being "the only real version".

SpudsMcKensey

3 points

2 months ago

It's the reason I love the movie. Anytime an asshole says "it wasn't like the books" I respond with "I couldn't read the books because it wasn't like the radio play."

frandrthy

2 points

2 months ago

I have the radio play until the quintessential phase on my phone at all times

blacksideblue

2 points

2 months ago

That happens when you operate an improbability drive.

cdpuff

2 points

2 months ago

cdpuff

2 points

2 months ago

I'm old enough to remember when it was first broadcast as a radio series. I avidly listened to it every week. I am convinced that one of Arthur's lines in that was "Did you know your robot can hum like Pink Floyd?", but that doesn't seem to occur in the audio CD set. Maybe I'm imagining it, maybe it's Adams playing with my mind!

ProtoKun7

2 points

2 months ago

Yeah that happened but CD releases were slightly edited. I have the full editions available and it happens about 17 minutes into Fit the Third.

Empyrealist

2 points

2 months ago

He's such a space dandy

remy62116

1 points

2 months ago

Video game!?!? 42!?!?!?!

mrchaotica

619 points

2 months ago

I like how the fact that it's only ever been a book trilogy, not a film trilogy, means the inaccuracy continues to increase.

LeCriDesFenetres

463 points

2 months ago

It actually checks out. 5 books, one movie, averages at 3.

deVriesse

149 points

2 months ago

deVriesse

149 points

2 months ago

I think there were 6 or 12 radio episodes originally. To set the record firmly crooked.

Swords_and_Words

30 points

2 months ago

And a really dope TV show

Still not sure if I prefer TV vapid hippie Ford or the hyperjazz post-psychadelic Ford from the Movie

Likewise torn on the two Dents

Guide Narration was way better in the show than the movie, though

domasin

17 points

2 months ago

domasin

17 points

2 months ago

The radio play will always be peak Hitchhikers for me. Peter Jones is the book.

Itchy-Examination-26

10 points

2 months ago

Absolutely incorrect. Stephen Fry is a world-class narrator.

traditora

6 points

2 months ago

I was gonna say that. Don't mess with Stephen Fry!

I've always said that if I ever have a car with one of those voice navigation thingies, I want it to be the voice of Stephen Fry.

Swords_and_Words

7 points

2 months ago

he was great, but I was more referring to the narration sections as a whole: the visuals compliment the narrations far better in the tv show imo

Itchy-Examination-26

4 points

2 months ago

Perhaps, but not many people can top Stephen Fry as a narrator. He has the perfect voice for it.

Swords_and_Words

2 points

2 months ago

he's on the short list to be the next David Attenborough

Swords_and_Words

6 points

2 months ago

voice was great, actor was great, but style was lacking

the guide narration is much better taken advntage of in the tv show imo, because it really uses the visual space to complement the words you are hearing and is full of easter eggs; the movie had very little visual complement by comparison

(holy cow, tough, the improbability drive sequences in the movie are stunning)

JahnBitWaf

5 points

2 months ago

The problem with the movie is that literally every time the script deviates from the radio/TV it is to replace something great with something appallingly shit.

By the time it has strayed into all new content, it is some of the worst, most pointless material ever filmed, and I’m including Hallmark channel Christmas romance movies where a woman from the big city who has forgotten the importance of her mother’s advice finds love and the real meaning of success when she is assigned to audit the business of a handsome carpenter in the town where she grew up.

The radio adaptations of the later books were the same. They made Ford describe something as “complete pants” (about 10 years after that phrase became as stale as a Keep Calm and Carry On teatowel.)

ScoobyDoNot

4 points

2 months ago

The radio adaptations of the later books were the same. They made Ford describe something as “complete pants” (about 10 years after that phrase became as stale as a Keep Calm and Carry On teatowel.)

Arguably in keeping for an alien who named himself after an obsolete car and managed to increase the review of the earth by one word.

ProtoKun7

2 points

2 months ago

The TV show is wonderful and up there with the radio for my favourite versions though I ought to read the books properly at some point; I've got access to them but not read cover to cover except for The Restaurant at the End of the Universe as I have a movie promo copy of that one.

The illustrated 1994 release is pretty great and the model they used for Trillian is mesmerising. She was only credited as "Tali" so I've no idea who she is.

Back to the TV show, a really neat fact is that the book animations (still my favourite) were all hand-drawn.

God_Dammit_Dave

4 points

2 months ago

that comment could have been written by douglas adams. bravo.

robotguy4

9 points

2 months ago

6 books, technically, but it's understandable if you don't count the last book.

Salty_Pancakes

6 points

2 months ago

When I reread now I like to stop after 4. I think it ends perfectly there. Mostly Harmless came out years later and I think Adams was in a more cynical frame of mind when he wrote that one.

Mammyjam

8 points

2 months ago*

Yeah, it’s ten years since I last read them but I think Adams himself admitted that 5 was extremely depressing. I believe he intended to write a sixth to set the record straight but died before he could (GRRM- please type faster)

Edit: a sixth book was written but not by Adams (though with his widows permission). Adams had intended to finish the trilogy of six https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/And_Another_Thing..._(novel)

domasin

4 points

2 months ago

I do like referring to And Another Thing as part 6 of the trilogy of 5. That said I haven't read it in a long time and while Colfer is a good author I didn't feel it held a candle to the Adam's books.

wonkey_monkey

3 points

2 months ago

but died before he could

He loved deadlines, especially the whooshing sound they made as they went by.

_DONT_PANIC_42_

2 points

2 months ago

Same.

McPick

8 points

2 months ago

McPick

8 points

2 months ago

No no no. The answer is 42.

RichardMcNixon

7 points

2 months ago

Where did you get that? Pull it out of a scrabble bag or something?

TheGreatZarquon

4 points

2 months ago

"Poor bastard. Probably spelled 'czrjrglwicz' again or something."

Unlucky-Cow-9296

4 points

2 months ago

... How many roads must a man walk down...?

JahnBitWaf

4 points

2 months ago

He had forty-two boxes, all carefully packed,
With his name painted clearly on each
But, since he omitted to mention the fact,
They were all left behind on the beach.

The Hunting of the Snark, Fit the First, Lewis Carroll.

PHIlthyFLYer

121 points

2 months ago

still would’ve loved if the my continued the movies man i actually adored that movie. i liked the old tv show and the books as well but i love sam rockwell, mos def, jim hensens creature shop, alan rickman, warwick davis, martin freeman, zoey deschanel, stephen fry, thomas lennon, john malkovich yeah fuck all those naysayers that shit was good

SunOnTheInside

103 points

2 months ago

Mos Def was a welcome surprise as Ford Prefect. I thought he played the character so well that it changed how I visualized him in the books. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but he’s perfect.

Come to think of it, all of the casting was solid.

I just wish they hadn’t shoehorned the romantic subplot between Trillian and Arthur in the last third of the film. They made Arthur into a whiny niceguy and reduced Trillian to a prize to be won.

Incredible visuals tho. All of the creatures and a lot of the sets were practical effects and full-sized animatronic puppets and costumes. Seriously, go look at the Vogons again and realize that they weren’t CG at all, and tell me that isn’t impressive as all hell.

Unlucky-Cow-9296

35 points

2 months ago

Yep, the romance really muddled it up. I remember in the book they built up Trisha McMillan as Arthur's missed one true love... Then she straight goes "you're boring, this guy had a space ship".

And that was it... Arthur dropped it, and just went on. I thought that was hilarious and actually showed a lot about Arthur's personality.

Drunky_McStumble

21 points

2 months ago

Yeah, the whole point of Arthur's character is that he is just a total sap. He's the ultimate "just some guy". He's not the hero, he's not even the sidekick. He is one dimensional in the way that certain types of people you meet in real life are truly one-dimensional. Like, you speak to them and quickly realize that that's genuinely it, that's their whole personality, that really is all they've got going on. Oh.

He doesn't get the girl, he doesn't have an arc (at least until So Long and Thanks for All the Fish) he is literally just some guy.

Uchiha_Itachi

2 points

2 months ago

He literally invented the sandwich bro! ;-)

PHIlthyFLYer

10 points

2 months ago

i can totally agree with this. i took it as douglas did in each different medium the tv show was different than the books the books were different from the radio show and the movie was different from all of it but the movie became the visuals for the books after i saw it. i just felt they nailed the cast at least for myself. god i wish it had continued man

[deleted]

8 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

8 points

2 months ago

I just rewatched it for the first time in years - it really holds up. I don’t mind the love subplot so much but for me I think I separate the books and the film in my head. I forgive the choices in direction based on the medium for a lot of things. It wasn’t perfect but I liked it.
I wrote this homage some weeks back….
https://127.0.0.1/r/Damnthatsinteresting/comments/x8klyf/comment/ink2j8b/

PHIlthyFLYer

2 points

2 months ago

holy crap man that is excellent. very much like a douglas adams my dude. thank you for that

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

Thank you 🙏

Drunky_McStumble

6 points

2 months ago

I'm ambivalent on the movie, but the Vogons were by far the best part.

Oriden

3 points

2 months ago

Oriden

3 points

2 months ago

They were done by the Jim Henson Creature Shop and knocked it out of the park.

Mammoth-Condition-60

4 points

2 months ago

That romance subplot messed it up for me and tarnished the whole movie. I didn't forgive it when I first watched it, but I'm thinking I should give it another chance, there was some good stuff in there.

VaATC

8 points

2 months ago

VaATC

8 points

2 months ago

Mos Def is just a flat out phenomenal actor!

I highly recommend the HBO movie Something the Lord Made. It is based on true events and Mos Def nailed the role and Allan Rickman gave him a lot to work with. A heartbreaking yet massively inspirational story about the birth of cardiac surgery.

renwel

4 points

2 months ago

renwel

4 points

2 months ago

Wow, I watched that years and years ago as a kid in some science class and had no idea that was Mos Def and Alan Rickman. I'll have to give it a rewatch.

thatpaulbloke

2 points

2 months ago

Mos Def was a welcome surprise as Ford Prefect. I thought he played the character so well that it changed how I visualized him in the books. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but he’s perfect.

It made Arthur into a complete idiot for ever thinking that Ford was from Guildford. Mos Def is a fine actor, but he's no hoopy frood and I suspect that he had no idea where his towel is.

Mammyjam

10 points

2 months ago

Bill Bailey as the whale

ToastyNathan

8 points

2 months ago

The movie is overshadowed by the book. It's still an excellent movie and one of my favorites.

lachlanhunt

2 points

2 months ago

I loved the television series. I used to watch that frequently. We had it recorded on Betamax back in the 80’s/90’s. I’ve also listened to all six phases of the radio series, which I highly recommend.

I didn’t really like the movie that came out in the early 2000’s.

heff17

0 points

2 months ago

heff17

0 points

2 months ago

I genuinely have no idea how someone who loved H2G2 could like the wretch of a movie. It went through the motions with all the jokes they couldn't get away with no doing, and crapped out a terrible movie around it. Seriously, all of the dry wit was replaced with cringe humor. They give a gun that can mass change people's opinions to a cult leader. There's a mega happy ending where everyone comes back to life, all the antagonists lose, and corny romance wins the day. The shits on the very foundations of what any of the versions have ever been about.

Sorry, the anger isn't directed specifically at you. I just loathe that film. Adams would've despised it. There's a reason he never let anybody but him have creative control over literally anything Hitchhiker's right up until he died.

JahnBitWaf

3 points

2 months ago*

You get all the upvotes I can give (1). I am convinced the reason HHGG didn’t get made into a movie during Adams’ lifetime was because he had to constantly stop people from trying to make the piece of shit they immediately started making the moment he died.

As I was watching the movie, in which the experience of waiting in a queue was brilliantly satirised by showing the characters waiting in a queue, I realised my life would be different: from now on when talking about how great HHGG is, I would need to qualify it with “… apart from the movie, obviously.” Right to the final seconds it does every possible kind of sickening cannibal-holocaust assault on the material.

My last memory before my stomach leapt up and throttled my brain was Marvin saying “No, the other end of the universe”, as if to advertise the fact that every single person involved in the production had no idea what “end” meant in that sentence and thus hadn’t even listened to the first radio series or read the second novel.

Breezyisthewind

2 points

2 months ago

And I honestly have no idea how someone who loves those books could not like that movie. It’s really great tbh.

WannieTheSane

10 points

2 months ago

Honestly, liking that trilogy is about the only sane thing you all get up to in the asylum.

Unlucky-Cow-9296

5 points

2 months ago

Did you build your house inside out?

WannieTheSane

6 points

2 months ago

Hmm... Not that I've noticed. I don't actually live in a house. I live Outside.

You see, one day after a middling-to-delightful meal I picked up a wet nap that had been provided and I looked at the back of the package. It was then, after reading that wet nap, that I realised the world was sick.

Knowing that you all needed someplace nice to rest for a bit I built you the Asylum. Unfortunately, there wasn't really much room left after building an asylum large enough to contain the world and as such I decided to just stay Outside the Asylum. I made the Asylum for the world to rest and recover from it's insanity; finding myself to already be quite sane I'm afraid I just can't bring myself to step foot in it anymore, not with the rest of you gibbering about out there.

The angels sometimes talk about the place being inside-out too, but it seems the right way about to me.

Btw, the wet nap that I saw, it said this:

Tear open and use.

I figured any world that not only required directions to use a wet nap, but also provided directions that couldn't possibly be of use to anyone, really just needed a few minutes to itself to sort things out.

I hear a box of toothpicks has been known to have a similar effect.

OMGYouDidWhat

6 points

2 months ago

That seems infinitely improbable, but in reality the plans have been on display for several years.

Crown_the_Cat

11 points

2 months ago

I enjoy recommending the books, except of course I always have to mention this aspect - despite the horrified faces of the people I am talking to.

NilMusic

8 points

2 months ago

I just grabbed the box set of 5 books from my used book store today. Have never seen the movies either. Am excited to dive into both!

Civil_Massacre

8 points

2 months ago

Fuck I’m jealous. It’s probably the only book series I think, man I wish I could read it again for the first time.

charmingpea

2 points

2 months ago

pacman404

3 points

2 months ago

Wait, they made movies of this?!?

Thendofreason

6 points

2 months ago

Only one movie. My comment was a joke. But there was a TV show that more closely followed the books

serendipitousevent

3 points

2 months ago

Which later became the extremely accurately-named Trilogy in Five Parts!

gruffi

3 points

2 months ago

gruffi

3 points

2 months ago

5 books in a trilogy of 4

GrrawlTv

3 points

2 months ago

Nothing is better than a 4 book trilogy, except maybe a 5 book trilogy.

UnnecessaryAppeal

3 points

2 months ago

While the books are a trilogy of 4 (or 5, but not 6) books, there is only one film, and that can't be described as a trilogy by anyone

jay-tux

3 points

2 months ago

Ah yes "book six in a trilogy of five" lovely

jay2josh

3 points

2 months ago

I have a book that's all the books in one. And it felt like I had schizophrenia by the end of it.

Thendofreason

2 points

2 months ago

The ultimate guide. It's a good book. Especially for the price.

HumbleEngineer

5 points

2 months ago

Trilogy? I only know of one movie!

Unlucky-Cow-9296

5 points

2 months ago

I love that cover line, but it's not a film trilogy (cries in nerd)

Thendofreason

4 points

2 months ago

Hence why it's inaccurately named

Unlucky-Cow-9296

3 points

2 months ago

Lol it's not in reference to it being a "film trilogy". It's the fact that after he finished it as a trilogy, years later he added a 4th book to do a new ending. Then he did it again, but he's dumb and hilarious and still called the 5 book series a trilogy.

And that set even had the short prologue novelette about Zaphod, so it was like 5 1/2 books. Which is even even better.

Thendofreason

3 points

2 months ago

I know. I've read them all. But my comment still stands. I Inaccurately Named it a movie trilogy

Unlucky-Cow-9296

1 points

2 months ago

Fair point, fair point.

Which book is your fave? I'm always curious, cause each of them are someone's fave.

Thendofreason

4 points

2 months ago

I kinda read them all in one summer. So it's a blur as which book is which. And then I bought the ultimate guide that has them all together.

I will say that the idea of "aiming at the ground and missing" lives rent free in my head.

Fly-headed_penis

2 points

2 months ago

I mean, they said right in the cover, the fifth book to the trilogy. That's legit methinks.

DatabaseRelative9861

1 points

2 months ago

YES FINALLY!!! SOMEONE SAYS IT!

kelseymh

1 points

2 months ago

How did I not know there were a trilogy?? I only ever saw the first one

AalphaQ

1 points

2 months ago

Wait... they made more movies?! I liked the first one